Volume 11 | Issue 4

Co-sponsored by the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, the Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems (TBioCAS) publishes peer-reviewed manuscripts reporting original and transformative research at the intersection between the life sciences and circuits and systems engineering disciplines. TBioCAS covers the latest state-of-the-art advances as well as critical reviews of emerging directions in circuits and systems with demonstrated biological and/or clinical applications in laboratory and/or clinical settings.

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Editor

Mohamad Sawan
Editor in Chief - 2016 - 2017
Polystim Neurotechnologies Lab
Polytechnique Montreal, EE Department
tbiocas-eic@ieee-cas.org

Dr. Guoxing Wang
Deputy Editor-in-Chief
School of Microelectronics
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
tbiocas-deic@ieee-cas.org

Articles

Presents the table of contents for this issue of the publication.

Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.

This Special Issue of the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems comprises expanded versions of selected papers that were presented at the 2016 IEEE International Symposium of Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2016). This premiere circuits and systems conference was organized in Montreal, Canada from May 22nd to May 25th, 2016 and attracted more than 1687 submissions out of which 46.3% of... Read more on IEEE Xplore

This paper presents a wearable microsystem for minimally invasive, autonomous, and pseudo-continuous blood glucose monitoring, addressing a growing demand for replacing tedious fingerpricking tests for diabetic patients. Unlike prevalent solutions which estimate blood glucose levels from interstitial fluids or tears, our design extracts a whole blood sample from a small lanced skin wound using a... Read more on IEEE Xplore

The development of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors has demonstrated significant advantages in nanomedicine, particularly for ultrasensitive point-of-care diagnostics. To this end, the detection system is required to be compact, portable, and low power consuming at the same time that a maximum signal to noise ratio is maintained. This paper reports a CMOS front-end with integrated... Read more on IEEE Xplore